HomePassenger Car GalleryNon-Passenger GalleryUpdatesLinksMore
Illustrated History of Connecticut License Plates
Joe Wasielewski - ALPCA Member 6996
All-Terrain
Ambulance
Amateur Radio
Apportioned
Boat Ramp
Bus
Camp Trailer to 1957
Camp Trailer 1958-
Camper
Classic Vehicle
Combination 1
Combination 2
Commercial to 1957
Commercial 1958-
Common
Construction
Dealer Motorcycle
Dealer New to 1969
Dealer New 1970-1989
Dealer New 1990-
Dealer Spec. Equip.
Dealer Used to 1969
Dealer Used 1970-1989
Dealer Used 1990-
Dismantler
Early American
Error Plates
Exp. Test
Factory
Farm
Fire Apparatus
Fish
Foreign Consul
Gasoline
Handicapped
Hearse
High Mileage Veh.
Interstate
Junk
Livery
Marine Trailer
M.F.G.
Military
Miscellaneous/Local
Motorcycle
Municipal
M.V. Dept
Parade
Permits
Political - State
Political - US
POW
Prototype
PUC
Repair to 1969
Repair 1970-
Sample
School Bus
Service Bus
Snowmobile
Special Equipment
Sphinx
State
Student Transport
Taxi
Temp. Metal Plates
Temp. Non-Passenger
Temp. Pass.
Temp. Reg. Certificate
Toll
Trailer
Trans.
Vanpool
Veteran
Volunteer Firefighter
Wrecker
Prototype

 

As the "Land of Steady Habits", Connecticut's license plates may seem boring- after all, the last basic design lasted for 43 years with only minor changes. Below is a sampling of things that have happened behind the scenes. Some of these led up to current plate designs, while others are just far-fetched.



   
Circa. late 1950's paint test plate. There was a whole series of these plates up for sale a number of years back - in all sorts of wacky color combinations. I only picked this one up. Despite the creative color schemes, the state settled for white on blue. Mid 1960s (?) test plate. You can see the successive increase in the size and stroke of each letter 'C'. I'm still trying to decide whether this was because of varying die sizes, or differing stamping forces used when embossing the letters.
   
 1983  
In the early 1980s, 3M made a large number of prototypes for many states. This particular one was made for Connecticut in 1983 in the same style as Vermont plates - the center section is slightly raised and the numbers are debossed. Continuing with the Vermont theme, this plate even has a tree in the top corner, in this case the Charter Oak.  As if the previous plate weren't close enough to Vermont yet, this one even uses the Vermont dies!
   
 Prototype  
 Here is a prototype of a fully-reflectorized plate in the traditional white-on-blue color scheme. This is again made with debossed numbers, similar to Vermont plates. Not a bad looking plate, easy to read, but we ended up with the light blue plates we see on the roads today. Another variation on the theme, this time with dies close to, if not the same as, those in use in Connecticut at the time. This is a pretty sharp plate- simple, good contrast, and bold easy to read characters. Exactly what a license plate should be.
   
Bus
ca. 1987 fully-reflectorized Bus prototype plate. This was made on Massachusetts sheeting.
How we know this was made with Massachusetts sheeting when it's just plain white? The Ensure Mark (hologram) tells us!
   
 Camp Trailer LIS Prototype Combination
Camp Trailer "Preserve the Sound" prototype. The CAMP TRL legend on this plate is vinyl decals.
When deciding on the design of new fully-reflectorized plates, consideration may have been given to this design which would maintain a look similar to the existing plates. Perhaps this design was too similar to the existing plates; Combination plates instead ended up looking just like passenger car plates except for the 4-letter stacked suffix.
   
  Dlr/Rep 
Late 1950s commercial blank.
This one has a shipping label on the back from the Pennsylvania DMV. I'm not sure whether Connecticut made this plate for Pennsylvania, or vice-versa.
1995 Dealer-Repairer prototype. This is a flat plate made using the "digital technology" that many states are moving towards (and some are then moving back away from). Other than when brand new, these plates simply are not as easy to read as embossed plates once they have some wear and dirt or road salt on them. Not to mention they are quite easy to "spoof"- reasonable facsimilies seem like the real thing from a distance.
   
 EA Legislature 
Fully-reflectorized Early American prototype blank. This style was never made with a reflective background.
ca. 1975 Legislature prototype.
This has reflective glass beading on the white paint and was made either as the state was moving to the white Polyvend plates or when they were moving away from them.
   
 LIS1  LIS2
Early prototype of the "Preserve the Sound" plate. Many small changes were made from this plate to the final approved design.
Later prototype of the "Preserve the Sound". Getting pretty close now, one of the biggest differences is now the font. I had purchased an even later prototype, but it ended up in one of the numerous packages the postal service has lost for me recently.
   
 Trailer Reflective Trailer Beaded 
 ca. late 1980s trailer prototype. This has a fully-reflectorized background.
The same plate with the standard painted background and reflective beaded numbers.
   
   
Here is what the first plate looks like when illuminated.
Here is the beaded variety. These two plates were side-by-side when the photo was taken. There is quite a difference - though it doesn't help that the beading is applied to a dark colored paint. The white blotchiness you see is the excess beads applied during manufacturing. These would normally wash off after the first rainstorm or two.
   
 UCONN  
It looks like "optional" plates were considered before the fully-graphic plates became all the rage. Most likely a decal would have been placed in the circle to the right.
   
HomePassenger Car GalleryNon-Passenger GalleryUpdatesLinksMore